Many people with lupus are prone to what is referred to ‘lupus headaches’. Lupus and headaches seem to be almost synonymous with 31.7% of lupus patients describing migraines and 23.5% describing tension-type headaches. Depending on which study you are looking at 33% to 78% of people with lupus have them. The existence of the ‘lupus headache’ is often contested, but many studies have formed definitive conclusions (Wikipedia, 2011).

The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) defines lupus headaches as a “severe, persistent headache; may be migrainous, but must be nonresponsive to narcotic analgesia. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) does not define lupus headaches, but propose several headache disorders based on the International Headache Society’s classification.

Since lupus usually occurs in women, 90% of lupus patients are female of childbearing age, and migraine headaches are common in women, many people believe that lupus just makes the patients more prone to the headaches than they usually…